Cork City Library – It Seems History is to Blame

Cork City Library – It Seems History is to Blame

Launched in 2013, the It Seems History is to Blame programme is being run by Cork City Library. The aim of the programme is to augment our understanding of the events from 1913-1923 – what happened, and why – and also “to learn lessons for our own time.”

So far, projects as part of this programme have included The Crucial 100: one hundred books which inspired a revolution and Europe’s Last Summer, amongst othersOne of the 2015 projects sought public suggestions on an Irish National Day.

As I was exploring the City Library website, however, what caught my eye was a digital centenary map of the major events of 1913-1923 around Cork City.

Continue reading “Cork City Library – It Seems History is to Blame”

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Visually Analysing “Pickwick Papers”

Visually Analysing “Pickwick Papers”

For my final Digital Humanities assignment this year, I was asked to experiment with some visualisation tools and then see what I can learn from a text by visualising it through an analytical process. This text can be anything that is publicly available – such as a book, film script or document, and the tool I decided to use is Voyant 2.0.

I chose to analyse  Dickens’ Pickwick Papers not only because it is such an enjoyable read, but also because Dickens is a master at shaping characters through their use of language. Every character has his or her own particular way of expressing themselves when speaking; so much so that certain colloquailisms in the English language can be easily recognised and associated with Dickensian characters – “Bah! Humbug!”, for instance. Therefore, I thought that the process of analysing various patterns and word recurrences in Pickwick Papers would prove to be both stimulating, fruitful and would answer questions such as

  • Out of the numerous characters in such a large text, which are the main ones?
  • How does Dickens develop/ cast off his idea of the Pickwickian club as the novel continues?
  • What were the differences in language use between the upper- and working-classes in the 19th century?

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My Experience with OpenStreetMap

My Experience with OpenStreetMap

Recently, I used OpenStreetMap, a digital tool for mapping, as part of my assignment for one of my Digital Humanities modules. I chose to map Rathcormac, a village in North Cork which I personally know. I found the experience enjoyable, beneficial and enlightening. In order to increase my readers’ understanding of this experience, I will explore it under the following points: the process I undertook; the implications of what I contributed; what I learned from the experience and how I feel that I might be able to apply the spatial or the crowdsourced initiatives in my own work, be it now or in the future. Continue reading “My Experience with OpenStreetMap”

TwXplorer: Digital Humanities Tool Review

TwXplorer: Digital Humanities Tool Review

Knight Lab is a joint initiative of journalists and computer programmers to design tools and apps, specially aimed at journalists, publishers and “media makers”. Every tool is open source and delightfully simple to access and operate. Some projects help their users to gather data, others to present it and yet others to analyse and interpret it. TwXplorer (Northwestern University Knight Lab, 2013), the tool that will be evaluated here, gathers data from Twitter according to your search term and presents the results in an aesthetic and comprehensible manner.

According to The Atlantic,

“Information flows through Twitter in dynamic, interconnected ways. That complexity has brought about, from historians, tools to try to capture this stream, and from journalists, tools to try to distill it.

[TwXplorer] does both.”(Meyer, 2013)

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